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Meet A Geologist: Leticia De Marchi

Have you wondered - What is going on under the surface of the Earth? You could dig a hole to find out, but that can only go so deep. What’s happening below the deepest hole we can dig? What is the center of the Earth made of? How are the mountains made? Why do earthquakes happen more in some places than others? Why do we have volcanos and why do they erupt? What can we learn about dinosaurs just by finding their fossils in certain types of rocks? These are the sorts of questions that keep geologists hard at work every day. Hi, I am Leticia De Marchi. I am a geologist in graduate school at...

My Fascination For Planet Earth

I was born in Campinas, a big city in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. When I was a child my parents moved to a farm not too far from the city. As a kid, I had the opportunity be in nature every day. I used to ride a horse alone in the countryside and, on these horse rides, I was always thinking about how things in nature were made. I wondered how plants, soil, rocks, rivers, and mountains were all related. With this curiosity, I started getting really interested in the history of the planet. I was always reading books and watching documentaries about the Earth. Through these books I...

What Do Geologists Do?

I am a geologist which means I am a detective of the Earth and how it came to be as it is today. When you look at the Earth, it might not seem like it’s changing much at all. But it is. Mountains are forming and eroding away, continents are moving around, rocks are being made and destroyed, and canyons are being carved out by rivers and glaciers. All of this is happening at a very slow pace. But sometimes geology happens fast. For example when a volcano erupts or an earthquake happens. Asking Questions Geologists study a ton of different topics about the Earth. What is going on under the...

Studying A Crater In Tennessee

We have hundreds of tons of material falling to the Earth from outer space every single day. This material is not in one big chunk, but lots of really tiny pieces like dust. However, every once in a while, a very big chunk of material can collide with planet earth. These rocks from space are called meteorites. When they hit the earth’s atmosphere, they catch on fire. If you are lucky, you can see this happen; we call them shooting stars! Most burn up in the atmosphere, but every once in a while one makes it through to the ground. Studying Flynn Creek Crater About 360 million years ago, a...

Leticia De Marchi

I am a Brazilian geologist in graduate school at Auburn University, and I study craters formed by meteorite impacts. 

When I’m not studying craters, I like riding horses, hiking, camping, listen to music and hanging out with my friends and family. 

This Month's Expert: Amanda Clark

Amanda Clark is a graduate student in the Department of Biological Sciences at Auburn University and an NSF graduate fellow. She uses molecular techniques to learn about ecology. Amanda is also runs an ecology camp for kids in Alabama. In her free time Amanda enjoys hanging out with friends, crocheting and hiking. Amanda will be our expert for the month of September. Maybe you share her love for animals or her passion for science? Or you have questions for Amanda? She would love to hear from you and will be responding to your questions in each article. Do check out Amanda's three-part story...

My Path To Science

In high school, I already knew I wanted to work in science! I’ve always wanted to answer the question: Why does this happen and how? I was a part of a team called B.E.S.T., which stands for B oosting E ngineering S cience and T echnology. Teams would work together to build robots that could complete jobs in a competition. In my first year, we had to build a robot that could fix a problem with the Hubble Space Telescope -- a telescope that was launched into outer space in 1990 and that is still taking really amazing photos of space today! Our robot had to turn off a switch, just like your...

What Is Ecology?

People who are studying connections between living things or between living things and the environment are called ecologists. Ecology is all about relationships, or connections! Ecology seeks to answer questions about how living things are linked together like, “What is the connection between sharks and remoras, the cool suckerfish that can be seen clinging to sharks?” It seeks to answer questions about how living things are linked to certain habitats like, “Why can you only find the pink land iguana on one of the Galapagos Islands?” Ecology even seeks to answer questions about human...

Amanda Clark

Amanda Clark is a graduate student in the Department of Biological Sciences at Auburn University and an NSF graduate fellow. She uses molecular techniques to learn about ecology.

Amanda is also runs an ecology camp for kids in Alabama. In her free time Amanda enjoys hanging out with friends, crocheting and hiking.

Following My Love For Animals

During my early childhood years, I would spend time with my step-dad in Alabama, fishing and hiking through the woods. This is where I found my first box turtle crossing a busy road. I rescued the animal out of harm’s way. Without money for afterschool programs and sports, I would spend my spare time catching crawfish, tadpoles, frogs, and making home-made fishing poles. I would catch minnows in buckets, and use the minnows to catch larger fish, primarily sunfish, crappie, and catfish. I moved back to Chicago in the 3rd grade and became saddened that I was unable to swim at local beaches and...

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