Who Is France's Macron?

May 21, 2017 By Caitlin L,. Young Editor
iridescent's picture

He has been called France's youngest leader since Napoleon Bonaparte.

Emmanuel Macron, age 39, swept to victory in France's second-round of presidential election which was held on May 7, 2017. He defeated Marine Le Pen by a large margin of 62% of votes. He was inaugurated as President on 

Next, French citizens will head to the polls again on June 11 and June 18 to elect 577 members of their parliament. Currently, Macron's party does not have any seats in the parliament and the elections in June will be a test for his party. With each change of leadership comes new ideals and changes to the country. Macron needs a parliament that will support his hopes and dreams for the future of France.

Macron’s Rise to Power

Both of Macron’s parents were doctors, and he attended one of the most prestigious schools in France, Lycee Henri IV. From there, he became an investment banker and economy minister. Unlike the other presidential candidates, has always worked outside of the government.

In April 2016, he created his own political movement, called En Marche! (On the Move!), recruiting more than 200,00 members. His party’s ideals were neither right or left-winged, but more independent. As his party became more and more successful, Macron began to think about presidency, something he’d always been interested in. In November 2016, he announced his decision to run in the 2017 election.

Macron’s campaign relied on his political movement. He struggled to win votes from both parties in France, as well as from the working class. In addition, he was the only candidate that was pro-EU, or supportive of the European Union. 

Hopes and Dreams for France

While in office, Macron’s biggest focus will be on improving the economy. A total of €50bn (roughly 55 bn US dollars) will be dedicated to job training and creating green and sustainable energy. Macron also plans to cut down on corporate taxes, improve the public education system, and lower the unemployment rate by 2.7%.

Following the election is the selection of the president’s cabinet. The Prime Minister position was given to Edouard Philippe, mayor of Northern Le Havre. However, Macron’s cabinet is surprising-- one France has never seen before: a gender-balanced cabinet. Out of the 22 seats available, 11 will be taken by women and 11 will be filled by men. This percentage is much higher than other European countries.

With each change of leadership comes new ideals and changes to the country. Macron needs a parliament that will support his hopes and dreams for the future of France.